What is Transliteracy?

Please note this content has been updated and revised in the Beginner’s Guide to Transliteracy

What is Transliteracy?

Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks. –  www.transliteracy.com

What does it have to do with libraries?

Longer definition of transliteracy in relation to libraries

(originally published at Librarian by Day)

I have been asked this question many times by librarians so I am way overdue for this post.

Most recently I was asked “….are librarians the people best equipped to define and interpret transliteracy (as opposed to say cognitive scientists, anthropologists, or critical theorists).”  This is a modified version of my original answer.

No librarians are probably not the best people to define and interpret transliteracy. Fortunately we are (or at least I am) not defining it, and we certainly are not the only ones thinking about it.

Where did the word transliteracy come from?
Transliteracies came first, introduced by the Transliteracies Research Project directed by Alan Liu, Dept of English, University of California at Santa Barbara.

“Established in 2005, the Transliteracies Project includes scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and engineering in the University of California system (and in the future other research programs). It will establish working groups to study online reading from different perspectives; bring those groups into conjunction behind a shared technology development initiative; publish research and demonstration software; and train graduate students working at the intersections of the humanistic, social, and technological disciplines.”

Sue Thomas attended the first transliteracies conference and was inspired to form the PART Group (Production and Research in Transliteracy, now http://www.transliteracy.com)

” PART is a small group of researchers based in the Faculty of Humanities but researching in the Institute of Creative Technologies. The IOCT, which opened in 2006, undertakes research work in emerging areas at the intersection of e–Science, the Digital Arts, and Humanities”. – Thomas, et al.

What is transliteracy? Sue Thomas and her group use this working definition

Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks.

How is transliteracy different from media literacy or digital literacy or technology literacy?

…because it offers a wider analysis of reading, writing and interacting across a range of platforms, tools, media and cultures, transliteracy does not replace, but rather contains, “media literacy” and also “digital literacy.” Thomas, et al

It also includes technological, economic, social, cultural, and global issues (convergence). While it can be easy to tie transliteracy to technology

it is important to note that transliteracy is not just about computer–based materials, but about all communication types across time and culture. It does not privilege one above the other but treats all as of equal value and moves between and across them. Thomas, et al

Is transliteracy new?

No, but it has just been named recently. We are not seeing any new communication styles, only new ways of capturing and sharing those communications.  We are now using video or audio equipment to capture content that could only have been witnessed live.  We are using computers and other technology to share information that we would have previously shared over the phone or face to face.  Getting information from people you know rather than from a reference book or librarian is traditionally information seeking behavior.

What we are witnessing today is thus the acceleration of a trend that has been building for thousands of years. When technologies like alphabets and Internets amplify the right cognitive or social capabilities, old trends take new twists and people build things that never could be built before. – Rheingold (pdf)

Will all this new technology change how we think and act?

Probably. But even the bemoaning of the change in the format in which content or information is shared is new. Socrates beat us to it when he complained the the written word is

an aid not to memory, but to reminiscence, and you give your disciples not truth, but only the semblance of truth; they will be hearers of many things and will have learned nothing; they will appear to be omniscient and will generally know nothing; they will be tiresome company, having the show of wisdom without the reality. Pluto, The Phaedrus

References:


by Bobbi Newman

42 Responses to “What is Transliteracy?”

  1. The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now) | My Educational Technology Blog: A Place of Resources and Tools for Educators Says:

    […] Students need multiple ways to share and express themselves, particularly verbally and with pictures. This is part of transliteracy. […]

  2. What is Transliteracy? | Professional Learning ... Says:

    […] Please note this content has been updated and revised in the Beginner's Guide to Transliteracy What is Transliteracy? Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of plat…  […]

  3. Gregorian Rant – Tuesday, May 27 | St Greg This Week Says:

    […] Students need multiple ways to share and express themselves, particularly verbally and with pictures. This is part of transliteracy. […]

  4. Bowers-Information Literacy to Transliteracy | A Listly List Says:

    […] Libraries and Transliteracy […]

  5. The Things we Learn - ETL401 Task #1 The convergence of literacies in the 21st century Says:

    […] What is Transliteracy? Libraries and Transliteracy (2013) Retrieved form: http://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/what-is-transliteracy/ […]

  6. Broome-Tioga BOCES School Library System | A text in any other format is just as informative… Says:

    […] in many cases, live outside of format. In our multimedia world, visual literacy, audio literacy, TRANSliteracy is essential–and there’s a place for it in the Common […]

  7. The Things we Learn - The convergence of literacies in the 21st century Says:

    […] What is Transliteracy? Libraries and Transliteracy (2013) Retrieved form: http://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/what-is-transliteracy/ […]

  8. Transliteracy Resources #informationliteracy #transliteracy | A Listly List Says:

    […] Libraries and Transliteracy […]

  9. List of Resources on Information Literacy and Transliteracy | A Listly List Says:

    […] Libraries and Transliteracy […]

  10. What is Transliteracy? | Transliteracy | Scoop.it Says:

    […] What is Transliteracy? Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film,…  […]

  11. What is Transliteracy? | School Library Media S... Says:

    […] What is Transliteracy? Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film,…  […]

  12. Libraries And Transliteracy » The Goodwin Library Says:

    […]   http://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/what-is-transliteracy/ […]

  13. #LILAC13 – My day at Lilac part two | LibraryPatrick Says:

    [...] need for people to be ‘Transliterate was emphasised as a way forward, people need to be able to present themselves equally well on any [...]

  14. What is Transliteracy? | Thinking about literacy | Scoop.it Says:

    [...] What is Transliteracy? Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film,…  [...]

  15. Media literacy, information literacy, transliteracy…. | Itä-Suomen yliopiston kirjaston blogi – Matkalla IFLAan 2012 Says:

    [...] termi! Transliteracy. Enpä ole ennen kuullut, mutta oma kirjastoihmisten blogikin sillä jo on: http://transliteracylibrarian.wordpress.com/ Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and [...]

  16. What is Transliteracy? | Middle School Mania | Scoop.it Says:

    [...] What is Transliteracy? Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and fi… (RT “@thelibrarynews: What is Transliteracy?  [...]

  17. Christopher| Says:

    Не можешь найти нужный драйвер или утилиту? тогда тебе сюда!!! http://buycd.ru/bin/gm/kmplayer-programmu.html

  18. Anonymous Says:

    . !

  19. What is Transliteracy? | Teacher librarians and transliteracy | Scoop.it Says:

    [...] What is Transliteracy? What is Transliteracy? Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and fi… (RT “@thelibrarynews: What is Transliteracy? Source: librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com [...]

  20. stephgilchrist Says:

    How does it differ from multiple literacies? Are the multiple literacies within transliteracy or have a misunderstood?

  21. getting the fingers « Says:

    [...] of literacy in our digital, flat world, where does tutting fit in? How does tutting demonstrate transliteracy?  Is it also a form of visual, artistic, or cultural literacy? Besides being a very overt form of [...]

  22. Looking Forward: What’s New in Year Two « Libraries and Transliteracy Says:

    [...] and shift. In preparation for year two we’ve done some minor things like updated our the “What is Transliteracy” page to “Transliteracy for Beginners” It includes a revised introduction and links [...]

  23. The Card What?? « Livant Enterprises's Blog Says:

    [...] Transliteracy (the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media ) has been around for quite some time.   Transliteracy is concerned with what it means to be literate in the 21st century. It analyzes the relationship between people and technology, most specifically social networking, but is fluid enough to not be tied to any particular technology.1 [...]

  24. What is Transliteracy and How Does it Fit at Empire State College? @ Academic Technologies Says:

    [...] “the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media…” — What is Transliteracy? [...]

  25. Life in the Read Says:

    [...] with all of the content for weeks, months, years. One of the buzz words was transliteracy. Originally attributed to Professor Alan Liu and referring to a research group that studied the [...]

  26. Call for Proposals: Exploring New Frontiers in Teaching, Technology, and Transliteracy « e-Merging Says:

    [...] September 26, 2010 Call for Proposals: Exploring New Frontiers in Teaching, Technology, and Transliteracy Posted by kdhoffman under Networking opportunities, professional development | Tags: call for proposals, collaboration, conference presentation, critical thinking, faculty, information literacy, instructional design, librarians, professional development, SUNYLA, teaching, technology, transliteracy | Leave a Comment  Are you interested in teaching, technology and transliteracy? [...]

  27. Zeds Library News, August 8, 2010 « the zeds : library science Says:

    [...] What is Transliteracy? ” Libraries and Transliteracy (librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com) 44.637132 -63.588631 Tagged: Bobbi Newman, information literacy, iPad, Mark McBride, Peter Godwin, Rupert Colley, Tiffini Travis, transliteracy Posted in: Library News ← The Benefits of using WordPress.com Be the first to start a conversation [...]

  28. Lauren in Libraryland » Post Topic » How Did You Get Here? The Library Routes Project Says:

    [...] I will be a librarian. I will facilitate access to information, help further research, and promote transliteracy at every turn (even if that’s on my own [...]

  29. Common Sense Media, eSchool News, BWi’s Title Tales, and Transliteracy « The Library Notes Says:

    [...] What is transliteracy? Published in: [...]

  30. Lauren in Libraryland » Post Topic » The Digital Divide and Library School Students Says:

    [...] students come in. We supposedly care about information literacy, computer/digital literacy, and transliteracy — and we have the opportunity to prove it. At UA SLIS, we have at least two such [...]

  31. How to Create a Secure Password | Librarian by Day Says:

    [...] I talk about transliteracy I often use this stat It would take a hacker 5.15 minutes to hack your 6 character all lower case [...]

  32. Rashmi Moghe Says:

    Hi,

    I agree to what Lisa Perez has commented and suggested !

    thanks

    Rashmi

  33. kyle Says:

    Nicely done, Bobbi.

    I think many of us who are technically savvy take for granted the importance of these skill sets in today’s society. I do it too often.

    It’s important for libraries of all types to offer instruction and opportunities for learning about these diverse literacies.

    Keep up the fine work,
    ~Kyle~

    • Bobbi Newman Says:

      Thank you Kyle!

  34. Twitter This Week (3/7/10) | LibraryRemix Says:

    [...] What is transliteracy? Think transtexuality…for today! [...]

  35. Transliteracy . . . another new word . . . « Colleen Herman's Library Blog Says:

    [...] just start by saying that I loved the movie that we were asked to watch.  You can check it out at http://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/what-is-transliteracy/.  It was a short, quick clip that opens the door to large, long [...]

  36. Infolit (07/03/10) « pintiniblog Says:

    [...] > Libraries and Transliteracy Un nouveau blog: voir présentation ici [...]

  37. » sunday morning snippets lola's library lounge Says:

    [...] http://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/what-is-transliteracy/ [...]

  38. The Only Thing This Video Proves is 3 Year Olds Can Be Coached | Librarian by Day Says:

    [...] don’t argue that we need to change it is why I work so hard on the transliteracy issue, it’s why I started the blog. The struggle to incorporate new technology into libraries [...]

  39. Bobbi Newman Says:

    Thank you Lisa! I’ve heard it moves too fast and too slow. The good news is it was a slideshow before it was a video you can see it here http://www.slideshare.net/librarianbyday/libraries-and-transliteracy

  40. Lisa Perez Says:

    Great video! The message is right on target. My only other comment is that I wish it moved a bit more slowly between slides. Otherwise, love it!

  41. Coming Out Party: The Debut of the Libraries and Transliteracy Blog « The Unquiet Librarian Says:

    [...] libraries.  We will be providing you an organic “reading list” of resources related to transliteracy;  our blog also features a Twitter stream of the latest Tweets related to transliteracy.  You may [...]


Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 269 other followers

%d bloggers like this: