Transliteracy: Take a Walk on the Wild Side

“Transliteracy:  Take a Walk on the Wide Side”:  Paper presented by Susie Andretta of London Metropolitan University at the World Library and Information Congress 75th IFLA General Conference and Assembly in August 2009.

from the paper’s abstract:

In this paper we explore the concept of ‘transliteracy’ which according to Professor Thomas offers “a unifying perspective on what it means to be literate in the 21st Century [including] the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks”. Currently transliteracy is primarily the domain of Communication and Cultural Studies and this paper aims to position transliteracy in the professional domain of ‘practising’ librarians and within the remit of the library world. It is with this aim in mind that we examine the prefix ‘trans’ in terms of ‘moving across literacies’ and also in terms of ‘moving beyond literacy’ in order to evaluate the implications emerging from these two manifestations of transliteracy for the information professions and for the 21st Century Library. Examples of transliteracy practice by information professionals will provide evidence that libraries are already meeting the challenges of transliteracy by crossing the divide between printed, digital and virtual worlds to address the constantly changing needs of the learners they support.

Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy Warns of “Second Class Citizens” in the Digital Age

The Knight Foundation has released a new report Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy. A good deal of the content either is or could be applies to libraries.  The entire report is 148  pages, you can also download a 2 page summary that includes recommendations like these

  • 2: Increase support for public service media aimed at meeting community information needs.  Read more …
  • 6: Integrate digital and media literacy as critical elements of education at all levels through collaboration among federal, state, and local education officials.  Read more …
  • 7: Fund and support public libraries and other community institutions as centers of digital and media training, especially for adults.  Read more …
  • 10: Support the activities of information providers to reach local audiences with quality content through all appropriate media, such as mobile phones, radio, and public-access cable.  Read more …
  • 12: Engage young people in developing the digital information and communication capacities of local communities.  Read more …
  • 14: Emphasize community information flow in the design and enhancement of a local community’s public spaces..  Read more …
  • 15: Ensure that every local community has at least one high-quality online hub.  Read more …

The Foundation has also taken actions that affect libraries:

$3.3 million to improve free, public Internet access in libraries in 12 communities

$2.28 million in broadband access projects in underserved neighborhoods in three cities

Posted in Reading List, Reports. Tags: , , , . Comments Off
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 258 other followers

%d bloggers like this: