Collaborative Consumption

One thing which excites me about Transliteracy is, because of its newness, the skills involved are not well-defined. It seems like many people interested in the topic have an “I know it when I see it” approach to identifying skills and these skew toward computer-related skills, which is entirely legitimate since the need to be transliterate most obviously manifests itself when confronted with a new technology. Of course, Transliteracy involves a whole swath of cognitive skills that transcend navigating new technology.

One factor that suddenly seems, to me, so essential to Transliteracy, and not, perhaps, a skill per se, is the issue of trust. This insight dawned on me while watching Rachel Botsman’s TED presentation. Because Transliteracy often concerns itself with social media, the development of trust becomes very important. To a certain extent, trust is a teachable skill and librarians invest a great deal of effort in instilling notions of trust. How do we trust that a web site is reliable? But beyond that, individuals need to learn how and when other individuals are trustworthy. In a way, this notion of trust seems an obvious component of Transliteracy, but it only recently dawned on me how essential it is to our discussion.

Watch what Botsman has to say about trust. Does it seem like trust is an important element of our conversation? How teachable is trust? Can the level of trust she talks about be taught or are we relying on a cultural shift?

Video Diaries Across Borders and Platforms

The Center for Social Media highlights a fascinating project called Havana-Miami. The site features video diaries contrasting people who live in Havana and who live in Miami. This project shows how prevalent working in various media is for students, as The Center for Social Media explains:

These stories about work, family, sports, love, separation and connection appear three times a week on a social networking site that allows users to comment, embed and export videos and upload their own video and photographs. (The site has been receiving 50,000-60,000 hits per week.) Both production teams include training for young media makers. The US stories are shot by undergraduate honors students at the University of Miami’s School of Communication, trained by graduate students. The Havana team is led by a professional Cuban documentary filmmaker and include Cuban film school graduates.

This project also shows how valuable non-print media can be for academic studies.

Posted in Media Literacy. Tags: , , , . Comments Off on Video Diaries Across Borders and Platforms

Transliteracy: Take a Walk on the Wild Side

“Transliteracy:  Take a Walk on the Wide Side”:  Paper presented by Susie Andretta of London Metropolitan University at the World Library and Information Congress 75th IFLA General Conference and Assembly in August 2009.

from the paper’s abstract:

In this paper we explore the concept of ‘transliteracy’ which according to Professor Thomas offers “a unifying perspective on what it means to be literate in the 21st Century [including] the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks”. Currently transliteracy is primarily the domain of Communication and Cultural Studies and this paper aims to position transliteracy in the professional domain of ‘practising’ librarians and within the remit of the library world. It is with this aim in mind that we examine the prefix ‘trans’ in terms of ‘moving across literacies’ and also in terms of ‘moving beyond literacy’ in order to evaluate the implications emerging from these two manifestations of transliteracy for the information professions and for the 21st Century Library. Examples of transliteracy practice by information professionals will provide evidence that libraries are already meeting the challenges of transliteracy by crossing the divide between printed, digital and virtual worlds to address the constantly changing needs of the learners they support.
Posted in Information Literacy, Presentations. Tags: , , , , . Comments Off on Transliteracy: Take a Walk on the Wild Side
%d bloggers like this: