Clay Shirky Discusses the Emergence of New Literacies

Clay Shirky responds to Nicholas Carr’s assertion that “the Internet is making us dumber” with his essay, “Does the Internet Make You Smarter” in the Wall Street Journal. Shirky thoughtfully makes the case that we are living in a transitory period in which new forms of reading and writing are emerging as well as evolving meanings of “literacy.”

Every increase in freedom to create or consume media, from paperback books to YouTube, alarms people accustomed to the restrictions of the old system, convincing them that the new media will make young people stupid. This fear dates back to at least the invention of movable type.

This essay can help educators and librarians better conceptualize the scale of change and provides insights into the paradigm shift we are experiencing in how we define literacy.

Henry Jenkins: Fandom, Literacy, and Scholarship

Reading, writing, and understanding words on a page won’t cut it anymore. In a digitized world, Henry says young people need new skills that go way beyond basic composition and comprehension. Skills like play (“the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving”), collective intelligence (“the ability to pool knowledge and compare notes with others toward a common goal”), and transmedia navigation (“the ability to follow the flow of stories and information across multiple modalities”).
~Henry Jenkins~

Read this April 16 article at Boing Boing in which Henry Jenkins discusses the relationship between fandom and literacy:

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Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills Report

[tweetmeme source=”librarianbyday” only_single=false]The Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills Report from The Institute of Museums and Library Services looks at the role of libraries and museums in 21st Century Skills. It offers a plethora of useful information and suggestions in a concise readable format (only 40 pages) and it includes case studies and an interactive online assessment.

It includes a list of 6 steps with suggestions to build involvement, engagement and momentum:

  1. Engage with Community.
  2. Establish the Vision.
  3. Assess Current Status.
  4. Implement a Prioritized Plan.
  5. Focus on Comprehensive Alignment.
  6. Track and Communicate Progress

There is a nice (and extensive) break down list of 21st Century literacies and skills along with definitions.

Learning and Innovation Skills

  • Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Reason Effectively
    • Use Systems Thinking
    • Make Judgments and Decisions
    • Solve Problems
  • Creativity and Innovation
    • Think Creatively
    • Work Creatively with Others
    • Implement Innovations
  • Communication and Collaboration
    • Communicate Clearly
    • Collaborate with Others
  • Visual Literacy
  • Scientific and Numerical Literacy
  • Cross-disciplinary Thinking
  • Basic Literacy

Skills like critical thinking and problem solving are not only relevant for K-12 students and schools. There are millions of adult learners not in formal education programs looking to refine workplace skills. Even school-aged children spend the overwhelming majority of their waking hours in non-school settings, and increasingly they spend this time in organized out-of-school settings such as afterschool, museum, and library programs. In these settings, they develop important skills—such as problem solving, collaboration, global awareness, and selfdirection—not only for lifelong learning and everyday activities, but also for use back in K-12 schools and college classrooms.

Information, Media and Technology Skills

  • Information Literacy
    • Access and Evaluate Information
    • Use and Manage Information
  • Media Literacy
    • Analyze Media
    • Create Media Products
  • ICT (Information, Communications, and Technology) LITERACY
    • Apply Technology Effectively

Competencies like critical thinking, global awareness, and media literacy are no longer simply desirable—they are necessary. If 21st century skills are the new design specifications for national and individual success, our nation’s libraries and museums are well-positioned to respond to this need.

21st Century Themes

  • Global Awareness
  • Financial, Economic, Business and Entrepreneurial Literacy
  • Civic Literacy
  • Health Literacy
  • Environmental Literacy
Concerted action is required to meet the educational, economic, civic, and cultural needs of the community.Establishing a compelling vision around 21st century skills is critical.

Life and Career Skills

  • Flexibility and Adaptability
    • Adapt to Change
    • Be Flexible
  • Initiative and Self-direction
    • Manage Goals and Time
    • Work Independently
    • Be Self-directed Learners
  • Social and Cross-cultural Skills
    • Interact Effectively with Others
    • Work Effectively in Diverse Teams
  • Productivity and Accountability
    • Manage Projects
    • Produce Results
  • Leadership and Responsibility
    • Guide and Lead Others
    • Be Responsible to Others
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Literacy for the 21st Century: An Overview & Orientation Guide to Media Literacy Education

[tweetmeme source=”librarianbyday” only_single=false]Literacy for the 21st Century: An Overview & Orientation Guide to Media Literacy Education

CML’s plain language introduction to the basic elements of inquiry-based media education.

SECOND EDITION
Now expanded to include the Questions/TIPS (Q/TIPS) for both construction/production and deconstruction!

How does media literacy relate to the construction of media? How can critical thinking be taught and learned while students are producing media?

It’s not enough to know how to press buttons on technological equipment: thinking is even more important. Find out how to connect thinking with production in CML’s newly published 2nd Edition of Literacy for the 21st Century!

In a short and readable format, it:

Provides a complete framework for critical inquiry, using CML’s Five Core Concepts, and Five Key Questions for both construction and deconstruction of media, along with handouts.
Gives explanations and Guiding Questions to illustrate how to connect the Key Questions when consuming or producing or participating with media.
Provides in-depth explanations and the foundational role of the Five Key Questions of Media Literacy.
Offers a sample inquiry into visual language: “How to Conduct a ‘Close Analysis’ of a Media ‘Text.'”

Posted in Media Literacy, Reading List. Tags: , , . Comments Off on Literacy for the 21st Century: An Overview & Orientation Guide to Media Literacy Education
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