Information is Always Evolving

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The video below was made in 2007, the same year the term Transliteracy was coined by Production and Research in Transliteracy (PART).  It was created by Dr. Michael Wesch to show the way we find, house, and share information was changing.

Now in 2010, the video and its content are still relevant  This video really shows how the transliterate individual can do so much with the access to information we now have.  In addition to this, the video shows a clear need to educate people on how to transverse this now limitless sea of information. I think that this is where Participatory Librarianship and Transliteracy go hand in hand.  We need to understand how to help or patrons, students, friends, family, and colleagues become cognizant and comfortable with the tools they will need to communicate and collaborate with others.

Infowhelm and Information Fluency

[tweetmeme source=”librarianbyday” only_single=false]An interesting look at the amount of information we as a society are producing each year from the 21st Century Fluency Project

via Information Literacy meets Library 2.0

Information Literacy for the 21st Century

[tweetmeme source=”librarianbyday” only_single=false]This presentation was given by Sheila Webber at the 10th INFORUM conference held in Prague, Czech Republic, 25-27 May.

She also wrote a short paper to accompany it (pdf)  in which she expands the definition of information literacy

“Information Literacy is the adoption of appropriate information behaviour to identify, through  whatever channel or medium, information well fitted to information needs, leading to wise and ethical use of information in society.”

Appropriate information behaviour means IB that is best for the context. If your context is writing an essay at university, searching electronic journals may be best. If you are seeking information about using Google Docs to share material, then you might go to a specialist online discussion group for advice.

Webber outlines 7 key aspects of 21st century information literacy:

  • IL as context specific and context sensitive;
  • IL demanding a variety of behaviours: not just searching, but also encountering, browsing, monitoring, managing and creating;
  • People moving along complex paths to meet their information needs: moving between the virtual and physical worlds, and using different sources and spaces;
  • IL in digital environments;
  • IL with people sources;
  • People being information literate individually and collaboratively
  • People being aware they are information literate: you cannot be an information literate 21st Century citizen without being conscious of the need to develop these IL skills and attitudes, and continue to update your IL through your life!
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Libraries and Librarians as Sponsors of Transliteracy

This week I shared two presentations in which I outline how libraries can function as sponsors of transliteracy.  The first slidedeck was developed for a brief talk at Computers in Libraries 2010, and the second slidedeck is an expanded version delivered at a preconference session of the Alabama Library Association Annual Convention.  This resource page, while geared for the initial talk, also provides support for the second slidedeck.

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Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

[tweetmeme source=”librarianbyday” only_single=false]Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education from ACRL, (The Association of College and Research Libraries division of the American Library Association) includes a sections on the definition of information literacy, IL Technology, IL & higher education, IL & pedagogy, standards, assessments, performance indicators, and a practical guide for instruction librarians.  I’ve included the four standards & their performance indicators below but left out the included outcomes. You can read the document online or download a pdf.

Approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries on January 18, 2000, Endorsed by the American Association for Higher Education (October 1999) and the Council of Independent Colleges (February 2004)

Information literacy is a set of abilities requiring individuals to “recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.”1

An information literate individual is able to:

  • Determine the extent of information needed
  • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • Evaluate information and its sources critically
  • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
  • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally

Standard One – The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the information needed.

Performance Indicators:

  • The information literate student defines and articulates the need for information.
  • The information literate student identifies a variety of types and formats of potential sources for information.
  • The information literate student considers the costs and benefits of acquiring the needed information.
  • The information literate student reevaluates the nature and extent of the information need.

    Standard Two – The information literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently.

    Performance Indicators:

    • The information literate student selects the most appropriate investigative methods or information retrieval systems for accessing the needed information.
    • The information literate student constructs and implements effectively design search strategies.
    • The information literate student retrieves information online or in person using a variety of methods.
    • The information literate student refines the search strategy if necessary.
    • The information literate student extracts, records, and manages the information and its sources.

    Standard Three – The information literate student evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system.

    Performance Indicators:

    • The information literate student summarizes the main ideas to be extracted from the information gathered.
    • The information literate student articulates and applies initial criteria for evaluating both the information and its sources.
    • The information literate student synthesizes main ideas to construct new concepts.
    • The information literate student compares new knowledge with prior knowledge to determine the value added, contradictions, or other unique characteristics of the information.
    • The information literate student determines whether the new knowledge has an impact on the individual’s value system and takes steps to reconcile differences.
    • The information literate student validates understanding and interpretation of the information through discourse with other individuals, subject-area experts, and/or practitioners.
    • The information literate student determines whether the initial query should be revised.

      Standard Four – The information literate student, individually or as a member of a group, uses information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose.

      Performance Indicators:

      • The information literate student applies new and prior information to the planning and creation of a particular product or performance.
      • The information literate student revises the development process for the product or performance.
      • The information literate student communicates the product or performance effectively to others.

        Standard Five – The information literate student understands many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and accesses and uses information ethically and legally.

        Performance Indicators:

        • The information literate student understands many of the ethical, legal and socio-economic issues surrounding information and information technology.
        • The information literate student follows laws, regulations, institutional policies, and etiquette related to the access and use of information resources.
        • The information literate student acknowledges the use of information

        1. American Library Association. Presidential Committee on Information Literacy. Final Report. (Chicago: American Library Association, 1989.)

        The list of organizations with standards and definitions of the “new” literacies is long, I will be doing my best to post as many of them as I can under the Standards category.

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