Breaking Down Barriers in Communication

CC image used courtesy of BookMama

When sharing or communicating information most of us take for granted how easy it is to see the content, hear the audio, or tell another person what we have learned. Most of us never give a second thought to how this simple act might affect people with disabilities trying to disseminate information or share content. Thankfully with advances in technology these limitations no longer pose the hurdles and roadblocks they once did.

Libraries have always been early adapters for this portion of the community to provide access for people with different abilities through assistive technology and staff interaction. The very basic and beginning services such as having a staff member who can communicate through ASL, Braille collections, Braille transcription services, special playback equipment for use with recorded cassettes, books and magazines on recorded cassettes, Audiobooks, descriptive videos (DVS) Large Print materials, Mail-A-Book programs, and request lists for library customers that are accepted by mail, phone, fax, and e-mail. for the homebound are great examples of this.

Technology has started to add to these existing services in ways that we could have only dreamed of 20 or even 2 years ago. Now we have screen readers like JAWS (Job Access With Speech) and the speech function on Gale (listen to an example). Efforts are being taken to create more services like Access Keys for the Omeka archives, creating screencasts, adding closed captioning to videos on Youtube and Vimeo, the use of image services like Flickr and Picasa, and even more innovative devices like the EyeWriter initiative.

Take the time to learn the resources that your library offers this portion of the community and expand upon them. Remember that is our duty to connect people with information and help them convey what they have learned no matter the medium.

2 Responses to “Breaking Down Barriers in Communication”

  1. Alan Kelly Says:

    Yes, adding closed-captions to new or existing videos is a mutually smart idea, smart for the publisher (YouTube-r) and smart for the viewer. Not just that — it’s more intereesting and fun. Alan of VerbatimIT

    who, truth be known, produces timed-texts, the heart of a closed-captioned video.

  2. uberVU - social comments Says:

    Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by Strng_Dichotomy: Breaking Down Barriers in Communication via Libraries and Transliteracy. http://bit.ly/bcavvq


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